What is Mindfulness?

What is Mindfulness?

A quick google search of ‘Mindfulness’ will bring up hundreds of definitions, many sound complex but they all have common themes.

 

Here are my 5 favourites: 

 

“Mindfulness is the practice of cultivating conscious awareness of our thoughts, feelings and environment in every moment, without judging the experiences.”

“Mindfulness means maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment, through a gentle, nurturing lens.”

“Mindfulness is the art of accessing the energy that helps you recognize the happiness that is already in your life. Mindfulness helps you to silence your mind, calm your nerves, and examine your inner world.”

“Mindfulness is a way of befriending ourselves and our experience.”

“Mindfulness is a tool by which we can integrate the body and mind and be alive in every minute without getting lost in our thoughts.”

 

To summarise these definitions Mindfulness can be is centred around 3 key elements: Awareness, Acceptance and Presence

 

 

 

 

 

Mindfulness is quite simply, the opposite to Mindlessness. 

 

If you find yourself acting on auto-pilot often, making mistakes, saying the wrong things or experiencing lots of resentment blame or angst then you need Mindfulness. In motherhood this can present as disengagement from children, resenting your role, a loss of purpose, constantly being busy, outbursts at the children or wishing your time away.

 

 

 

 

Mindfulness is a way of life. A conscious, purposeful and better way to live. Mindfulness takes practice. The best analogy to describe this is by looking at physical exercise. Starting at the gym is HARD because you are set in unhealthy habits. The first few work outs are tough and you don’t notice much change. Its easy to give up because there are no immediate results and its pushing you out of your comfort zone. It takes practice, repetition and time, as well as a commitment to change. I you persist then eventually physical exercise becomes apart of your lifestyle and you cannot imagine life without it. A workout that was once really hard to complete becomes easy and automatic. The same can be said for mindfulness. It takes action, commitment and consistency. Eventually your brain creates new connections and the actions that once took hard effort, have now become automatic.

 

“Being mindful creates space to pause in challenging times. It replaces impulsive reactions with thoughtful and conscious responses.”

 

This is where Neuroscience comes into the equation. Neuroscience is a really fancy word to describe the science of the brain. People that believe their brain doesn’t change as an adult have a fixed mindset. Whereas, those that recognise that your mind can change have a growth-mindset. Science has proved that the brain is very capable of change. Here is a quick video to describe how the brain creates new and removes unused brain connections: 

https://youtu.be/ELpfYCZa87g

 

 

 

 

 

A we explore Mindfulness more you will realise that up to 90% of your day was acting our of habit or auto pilot. Mindfulness shifts into the conscious domains of the brain.

How does this affect your parenting?

 

 

A we explore Mindfulness more you will realise that up to 90% of your day is acting out of habit or auto pilot. Mindfulness shifts into the conscious domains of the brain.

How does this affect your parenting?

 

 

Video Thumbnail

 

 

 

Motherhood is one of the most demanding, stressful and challenging jobs in the world. At the same time it is the most rewarding and transformational experience. The thing is, you get to decide if you want parenting to be a positive or negative experience. You get to decide: to go on the journey with resentment and suffering, OR joy and delight.

Past habits, social conditioning and our own fears/ insecurities often determine our parenting choices and thus our experience. Mindfulness creates an awareness of these habits and reactivity; an acceptance of exterior circumstances and things out of our control; and an ability to be present and enjoy the most challenging moments of parenting. 

Mindful Mothering helps you to clearly understand your children without your own fears, expectations or insecurities colouring your behaviour. It allows you to love your child unconditionally and connect in a calm manner, rather than habitually.

After, the objective of parenting is to enjoy a mutual relationship of love, compassion, and awareness and to raise a child who is confident, healthy, and happy.

A quick google search of ‘Mindfulness’ will bring up hundreds of definitions, many sound complex but they all have common themes.

 

Here are my 5 favourites: 

 

“Mindfulness is the practice of cultivating conscious awareness of our thoughts, feelings and environment in every moment, without judging the experiences.”

“Mindfulness means maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment, through a gentle, nurturing lens.”

“Mindfulness is the art of accessing the energy that helps you recognize the happiness that is already in your life. Mindfulness helps you to silence your mind, calm your nerves, and examine your inner world.”

“Mindfulness is a way of befriending ourselves and our experience.”

“Mindfulness is a tool by which we can integrate the body and mind and be alive in every minute without getting lost in our thoughts.”

 

To summarise these definitions Mindfulness can be is centred around 3 key elements: Awareness, Acceptance and Presence

 

 

 

 

 

Mindfulness is quite simply, the opposite to Mindlessness. 

 

If you find yourself acting on auto-pilot often, making mistakes, saying the wrong things or experiencing lots of resentment blame or angst then you need Mindfulness. In motherhood this can present as disengagement from children, resenting your role, a loss of purpose, constantly being busy, outbursts at the children or wishing your time away.

 

 

 

 

Mindfulness is a way of life. A conscious, purposeful and better way to live. Mindfulness takes practice. The best analogy to describe this is by looking at physical exercise. Starting at the gym is HARD because you are set in unhealthy habits. The first few work outs are tough and you don’t notice much change. Its easy to give up because there are no immediate results and its pushing you out of your comfort zone. It takes practice, repetition and time, as well as a commitment to change. I you persist then eventually physical exercise becomes apart of your lifestyle and you cannot imagine life without it. A workout that was once really hard to complete becomes easy and automatic. The same can be said for mindfulness. It takes action, commitment and consistency. Eventually your brain creates new connections and the actions that once took hard effort, have now become automatic.

 

“Being mindful creates space to pause in challenging times. It replaces impulsive reactions with thoughtful and conscious responses.”

 

This is where Neuroscience comes into the equation. Neuroscience is a really fancy word to describe the science of the brain. People that believe their brain doesn’t change as an adult have a fixed mindset. Whereas, those that recognise that your mind can change have a growth-mindset. Science has proved that the brain is very capable of change. Here is a quick video to describe how the brain creates new and removes unused brain connections: 

https://youtu.be/ELpfYCZa87g

 

 

 

 

 

A we explore Mindfulness more you will realise that up to 90% of your day was acting our of habit or auto pilot. Mindfulness shifts into the conscious domains of the brain.

How does this affect your parenting?

 

 

 

A we explore Mindfulness more you will realise that up to 90% of your day is acting out of habit or auto pilot. Mindfulness shifts into the conscious domains of the brain.

 

 

Video Thumbnail

 

 

 

Motherhood is one of the most demanding, stressful and challenging jobs in the world. At the same time it is the most rewarding and transformational experience. The thing is, you get to decide if you want parenting to be a positive or negative experience. You get to decide: to go on the journey with resentment and suffering, OR joy and delight.

Past habits, social conditioning and our own fears/ insecurities often determine our parenting choices and thus our experience. Mindfulness creates an awareness of these habits and reactivity; an acceptance of exterior circumstances and things out of our control; and an ability to be present and enjoy the most challenging moments of parenting. 

Mindful Mothering helps you to clearly understand your children without your own fears, expectations or insecurities colouring your behaviour. It allows you to love your child unconditionally and connect in a calm manner, rather than habitually.

After, the objective of parenting is to enjoy a mutual relationship of love, compassion, and awareness and to raise a child who is confident, healthy, and happy.

A quick google search of ‘Mindfulness’ will bring up hundreds of definitions, many sound complex but they all have common themes.

 

Here are my 5 favourites: 

 

“Mindfulness is the practice of cultivating conscious awareness of our thoughts, feelings and environment in every moment, without judging the experiences.”

“Mindfulness means maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment, through a gentle, nurturing lens.”

“Mindfulness is the art of accessing the energy that helps you recognize the happiness that is already in your life. Mindfulness helps you to silence your mind, calm your nerves, and examine your inner world.”

“Mindfulness is a way of befriending ourselves and our experience.”

“Mindfulness is a tool by which we can integrate the body and mind and be alive in every minute without getting lost in our thoughts.”

 

To summarise these definitions Mindfulness can be is centred around 3 key elements: Awareness, Acceptance and Presence

 

 

 

 

 

Mindfulness is quite simply, the opposite to Mindlessness. 

 

If you find yourself acting on auto-pilot often, making mistakes, saying the wrong things or experiencing lots of resentment blame or angst then you need Mindfulness. In motherhood this can present as disengagement from children, resenting your role, a loss of purpose, constantly being busy, outbursts at the children or wishing your time away.

 

 

 

 

Mindfulness is a way of life. A conscious, purposeful and better way to live. Mindfulness takes practice. The best analogy to describe this is by looking at physical exercise. Starting at the gym is HARD because you are set in unhealthy habits. The first few work outs are tough and you don’t notice much change. Its easy to give up because there are no immediate results and its pushing you out of your comfort zone. It takes practice, repetition and time, as well as a commitment to change. I you persist then eventually physical exercise becomes apart of your lifestyle and you cannot imagine life without it. A workout that was once really hard to complete becomes easy and automatic. The same can be said for mindfulness. It takes action, commitment and consistency. Eventually your brain creates new connections and the actions that once took hard effort, have now become automatic.

 

“Being mindful creates space to pause in challenging times. It replaces impulsive reactions with thoughtful and conscious responses.”

 

This is where Neuroscience comes into the equation. Neuroscience is a really fancy word to describe the science of the brain. People that believe their brain doesn’t change as an adult have a fixed mindset. Whereas, those that recognise that your mind can change have a growth-mindset. Science has proved that the brain is very capable of change. Here is a quick video to describe how the brain creates new and removes unused brain connections: 

https://youtu.be/ELpfYCZa87g

 

 

 

 

 

A we explore Mindfulness more you will realise that up to 90% of your day was acting our of habit or auto pilot. Mindfulness shifts into the conscious domains of the brain.

How does this affect your parenting?

 

 

 

A we explore Mindfulness more you will realise that up to 90% of your day is acting out of habit or auto pilot. Mindfulness shifts into the conscious domains of the brain.

How does this affect your parenting?

 

 

Video Thumbnail

 

 

 

Motherhood is one of the most demanding, stressful and challenging jobs in the world. At the same time it is the most rewarding and transformational experience. The thing is, you get to decide if you want parenting to be a positive or negative experience. You get to decide: to go on the journey with resentment and suffering, OR joy and delight.

Past habits, social conditioning and our own fears/ insecurities often determine our parenting choices and thus our experience. Mindfulness creates an awareness of these habits and reactivity; an acceptance of exterior circumstances and things out of our control; and an ability to be present and enjoy the most challenging moments of parenting. 

Mindful Mothering helps you to clearly understand your children without your own fears, expectations or insecurities colouring your behaviour. It allows you to love your child unconditionally and connect in a calm manner, rather than habitually.

After, the objective of parenting is to enjoy a mutual relationship of love, compassion, and awareness and to raise a child who is confident, healthy, and happy.

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